Towards a Political Economy of Information

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Book by Roberto Verzola and essay by Yochai Benkler


The Book

* Book. Roberto Verzola. Towards a Political Economy of Information: Studies on the Information Economy, Foundation for Nationalist Studies, 2004


URL = http://rverzola.files.wordpress.com/2008/01/infoeconomy-verzola.pdf

The book analyzes the social impacts of new information and communications technologies (ICT).


Contents

The following is the table of contents of the book:


Part I. Information and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)


1. The miracle of the loaves

2. A new offensive against the Third World

3. U.S. piracy in the 19th century

4. The “piracy" of intellectuals

5. GATT: Free Trade or Monopoly Growth?

6. IPR: a clash of value-systems

7. Towards a political economy of information


Part II. ICTs and the Internet


8. Expanding market for information economies

9. A hierarchy of access

10. ICT: job creator or destroyer?

11. A poor learning environment

12. An interactive idiot box

13. Private space controlled by rentiers

14. Perverse subsidies

15. Internet cafes: connectivity for the masses?


Part III. Genetic Information And Genetic Engineering


16. Turning farmers into “pirates"

17. Pirating genetic resources

18. Beware of modern vampires

19. Biosafety and genetic contamination


Part IV. Monopolistic Information Economies


20. Information monopolies and the WTO

21. Globalization: the third wave

22. Cyberlords: rentier class of the information sector

23. Testing the political strength of a cyberlord

24. Globalization: poor design?

25. What could be more important than efficiency?


Part V. Alternatives: A Non-Monopolistic Information Sector


26. A well-kept IT secret

27. IT or AT?

28. Community rights over biological material: property or moral rights?

29. Low-cost strategies for ICT deployment in developing countries

30. Greening the information sector

31. Alternatives to globalization


Excerpts


The Essay

  • Article: “Freedom in the Commons, Towards a Political Economy of Information,” Duke Law Journal 52 (2003):1249