Video eCommerce

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Video eCommerce

"Video eCommerce sites allow you to legally stream the latest cinema movies and TV shows from your computer.

List from Unmediated at http://www.unmediated.org/2007/02/online_video_in.html :

  • Guba was one of the first to enter this market, being founded in 1998. They are not only a video eCommerce site, but have free offerings and also a video sharing component. But video sharing on Guba is very small compared to video eCommerce. One of Guba's co-founders left the company after the YouTube acquisition and said in an interview that YouTube won the big prize - and there will be no more big prizes in the industry!
  • Amazon Unbox can be easily described as the iTunes of videos. Unbox allows you to preview and buy a wide selection of TV shows and movies for very low prices, starting from $1.99. The videos can be watched via an exclusive client app from Amazon.
  • MovieFlix offers videos in Real format. They offer 2 membership programs: free and premium. Besides the freely accessible videos, you can pay a monthly fee of $7.99 and access their 4000 titles - the quality is arguable though.
  • Vongo - if you are not a US resident, don't even try visiting their site. Well, you can use proxy servers, but Vongo has strict access restrictions - not only limited by browser and OS types, but also your location. The service works in USA only and they are known for their TV spots. The service requires you to install a client, then you pay $9.99 per month to get access to an unlimited number of movies.
  • MovieBeam is yet another video sharing site. It is pay per watch based and the prices start from $1.99.

This is another crowded market. Other players include MovieLink, CinemaNow, MarketBeam and the video eCommerce offerings of bigcos like Apple, Real and WalMart. Also, the Venice Project (Joost) from the Skype founders is targeting this market. Check out a recent Techcrunch comparison to review some of companies mentioned under this category." (http://www.unmediated.org/2007/02/online_video_in.html)