FLOAmerica

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= free, libre, open source America project

URL = http://www.floamerica.org

Devin Balkind:

"Devin <[email protected]>:


"The fundamental principle of the type of open government we advocate is localism. We need to make it easy for people to deploy their own open source systems for common needs like schools and hospitals, and then make it easy for them to connect their system into a network that shares data and structures it for easy analysis. The technology platforms already exist in the form of open source CMS's, and most of the components exist too. They just haven't' been organized into complete systems that people can consume, they haven't been documented appropriately, and they haven't been connected together in a network. Most important of all, the story of how the system could work hasn't been successfully told, because it was, we'd be hearing politicians talking about open source as a solution to the budget crisis.

We're calling this project FLOAmerica (free, libre, open source America.)


More Information

More info at floamerica.org."

Wiki on Sarapis

Presentation FLOAmerica Part 1: The Concept

On P2P

Our society is transforming from corporate production paradigms made possible by proprietary industrial technologies to participatory production paradigms made possible by free/libre/open source networked technologies. This is great news because participatory production is more efficient, more equitable and more sustainable than corporate production, and also a lot more fun!

The amount of free/libre/open source (FLO) technologies accessible to the American people is increasing everyday, and as these technologies advance, so does the capacity of each American to create wealth for him or her self. By investing in the development and deployment of strategically significant FLO technologies, we can create the tools we need to drastically increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the organizations in our communities, including schools, hospitals, local governments, police/fire departments, utilities, social service organizations, and businesses of all types.

Four Trends Transforming our Society

  • Free/Libre/Open source software, hardware, data and knowledge allows its users [Fondue Forks to participate in its continued development by making its source materials accessible and its development process transparent. FLO projects are structured around the first rule of participation: you can always walk, and with FLO, you can take a copy of all the project's materials with you. This is called a fork, and it's what differentiates FLO projects from conventional ones.
    • Interesting Facts
      • FLO is often produced for no financial compensation by people simply solving their own problems.
      • Almost every piece of software has at least some open source code in it.
      • Thousands of widely used products that are made entirely of open source code: Apache, Linux, Ubuntu, Android, Wikipedia, Wordpres, Joomla, Drupal, CiviCRM, JomSocial, Redmine...
    • Wikipedia's list of free/libre/open source software
    • [OpenImperative] has a curated list of great FLO software products for individuals and organizations.
    • [FLO Solutions Resources] has links to lots of cool FLO projects.
    • Douglas Rushkoff's 2003 book Open Source Democracy
  • [Open work spaces] (coworking, new working, maker, etc) are popping up all over the world, offering independent workers physical infrastructure and a community support network that helps it's members succeed. We view these spaces as the physical platform upon which people can participate in the emerging post-industrial paradigm of participatory production.
  • [Local economics] organizations are sprouting up everywhere around a variety of different practices including farmers markets, food coops, small business networks, local trading networks and intentional communities.
  • [Open government] initiatives are popping up at the city, state and federal levels, provide us with the information and human capital necessary for extensive analysis of a wide variety of government programs.

FLO Tools

http://groups.drupal.org/aegir-hosting-system


Incorporating FLO into Political Messaging

[CPAC Flier]

"Participation builds transparency to deliver efficiency." Noel Hidalgo, OpenNY Forum

1. Be optimistic: Open source technology is accessible technology, so the more advanced open source technologies become, the more wealth each individual can create. It's that simple and that awesome. The vast majority of people don't know open source exists because the media hasn't told them about it. Participation in open (source) projects is a truly evolutionary economic activity that moves us beyond coercive post-industrial economic practices and into networked, voluntary ones.

2. Champion open government: Progressives and libertarians agree that all government activity (except classified military info) should be available to the public in the most accessible ways possible so open government should be viewed as the bridge between two former philosophical nemesis. As we open government up, we can see where inefficiencies are and address them with actions. Whether the actions are reorganization or elimination is a conversation that can only happen after we've achieved the first milestone of radically opening up the government.

3. Articulate a vision: There is an end goal - a meta objective - which is transitioning America from a post-industrial society with a monopolized currency that inefficiently monetizes value into a networked society with free currencies that efficiently allocates capital to participants. Localism, which is voluntary participation in local economic exchanges and is NOT coercive protectionosm, is an objective almost all America can agree on and work towards. Only open source technologies can be localized and decentralized. Closed/proprietary technologies can not be localized so we should always avoid using them when open alternaitves exist.

4. Attract volunteers: There are many things people can do right now to support the open government movement. The more liberty advocated we get into this movement, the more obvious it will become to everyone that liberty is a political persuasion that transcends the Republican/Democrat (Coke/Pepsi) debate and advocates effective, functional and fair governance.

The History of Government-Financed FLO

The idea of government financing the development and deployments of FLO technology is at least as old as the 'agricultural societies' of colonial times and was the inspiration behind Ben Franklin's Almanac. The concept was codified into law by the Morrell Act of 1862, which created our nation's land grant university system to "to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life." The land grant system was quite successful at this task until World War One, when the system's focus shifted from empowering Americans with new technologies to increasing yields/acre by any means necessary, including the introduction of petrochemicals and genetically modified seeds

Fortunately, good ideas never disappear forever and FLO reemerged in the software industry as a way to create standards and allow online communities to use, modify, improve and share critically important technology solutions. What began as a way to develop back end server software has now become the most widely used method of software production in the world, responsible for some of the most successful products of all time: Apache, Linux, Firefox, Media Wiki, Wordpress, Joomla, Drupal, OpenOffice. The list goes on and on.

Thanks to projects like the Open Architecture Network, the Global Village Construction Set and Reprap, FLO designs for housing, agricultural machinery, personal fabrication devices and much, much more are appearing all over the internet, making it possible for us to collaboratively develop the tools we all need to create more sustainable, more resilient and more comfortable communities.

Land-Grant in United States Sources:

  • "Treaty of Guadalpe Hidalgo: Findings and Possible Options Regarding Longstanding Community Land Grant Claims" by US Government Accountability Office

In Colonial America, starting in the 16th century, land grants were given for the purpose of establishing settlements, missions, and farms. Under colonial law and the doctrine of planting and seeding, a patentee had to cultivate 1-acre (4,000 m2) of land and build a small house on the property, otherwise the patent would revert to the government. In order to find some time for myself I decided to search for service that could supply me with the prime quality custom essays at prices that would be reasonable enough. The final choice was QualityEssay.Com as they did have an excellent reputation. Starting with the American Revolutionary War, United States veterans often received land grants in lieu of other remuneration. Between 1783 and 1821, Spain offered land grants to anyone who settled in their colony of Florida. When that colony was transferred to the United States, the resulting treaty agreed to honor all valid land grants.

Land-Grant Universities Sources:

  • Title 7 of the US Code
  • “The Land Grant Tradition” by Association of Public and Land-grant Universities
  • History of Iowa State by Iowa State University

Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States designated by each state to receive Fondue Forks UK ] the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890.

The Morrill Acts funded educational institutions by granting federally controlled land to the states for the states to develop or sell to raise funds to establish and endow "land grant" colleges. The mission of these institutions as set forth in the 1862 Act is to focus on the teaching of agriculture, science and engineering as a response to the industrial revolution and changing social class rather than higher education's historic core of classical studies.

History

The concept of publicly-funded agricultural and technical educational institutions first rose to national attention through the efforts of Jonathan Baldwin Turner in the late 1840s. The first land-grant bill was introduced in Congress by Representative Justin Smith Morrill of Vermont in 1857. The bill passed in 1859, but was vetoed by President James Buchanan. Morrill resubmitted his bill in 1861, and it was ultimately enacted into law in 1862.

Prior to enactment of the Morrill Act in 1862, Michigan State University was chartered as a state land-grant institution on February 12, 1855, as the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, receiving an appropriation of 14,000 acres (57 km2) of state-owned land. The Farmers' High School of Pennsylvania, later to become Pennsylvania State University, followed as a state land-grant school on February 22 of that year.

Upon passage of the federal land grant law in 1862, Iowa State Agricultural College (now Iowa State University) was the first existing school whose state legislature accepted the provisions of the Morrill Act, on September 11, 1862. The first land-grant institution newly created under the Act was Kansas State University, established on February 16, 1863. The oldest school to hold land-grant status presently is Rutgers University, founded in 1766 and designated the land-grant college of New Jersey in 1864.

West Virginia State University is the only current land-grant university to have surrendered its land-grant status, which happened in 1957, and to later regain this status, which happened in 2001; and is also the smallest land-grant university in the country.

Expansion

While today's land grant universities were initially known as land-grant colleges, only a small handful of the seventy-some institutions which evolved from the Morrill Acts still retain "College" in their official names.

The University of the District of Columbia received land-grant status and a $7.24 million endowment (USD), in lieu of a land grant, in 1967. In a 1972 Special Education Amendment, American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, and the Virgin Islands each received $3 million.

In 1994, 29 Tribal colleges and universities became land grant institutions under the Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act. In 2008, 32 tribal colleges and universities have land grant status. Most of these are two-year degree granting colleges. However, six are four-year institutions, and two offer a master's degree.

Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act

The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are United States statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, including the Morrill Act of 1862 and the Morrill Act of 1890.

For 25 years prior to the first introduction of the bill in 1857, there was a political movement calling for the creation of agriculture colleges. The movement was led by Professor Jonathan Baldwin Turner of Illinois College. On February 8, 1853, the Illinois Legislature adopted a resolution, drafted by Turner, calling for the Illinois congressional delegation to work to enact a land-grant bill to fund a system of industrial colleges, one in each state. Senator Lyman Trumbull of Illinois believed it was advisable that the bill should be introduced by an eastern congressman, and two months later Representative Justin Smith Morrill of Vermont introduced his bill.

Unlike the Turner Plan, which provided an equal grant to each state, the Morrill bill allocated land based on United States Video the number of senators and representatives each state had in Congress. This was more advantageous to the more populous eastern states.

The Morrill Act was first proposed in 1857, and was passed by Congress in 1859, but it was vetoed by President James Buchanan. In 1861, Morrill resubmitted the act with the amendment that the proposed institutions would teach military tactics as well as engineering and agriculture. Aided by the secession of many states that did not support the plans, this reconfigured Morrill Act was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on July 2, 1862.

Ways to Accelerate FLO Development

  • Land grants for FLO development
  • Require government agencies only purchase FLO licensed solutions
  • Finance the development of FLO solutions for common challenges

Get Involved Now

Activists

Officials

Resources

Sunlight Foundation has a tremendous amount of projects with which to collaboration.

Participatory Politics Foundation is a New York based nonprofit that built OpenCongress and is working on a similar application for open city and state governments.

Office of DC CTO is a primary mover in the open city government movement.

Code for America "Connecting city governments and Web 2.0 talent."

OpenPlans is a New York based nonprofit that helped create Open311 and other technology intensive open government projects.

Knowledge as Power: "KAP allows you to track legislation, communicate with lawmakers, and impact the laws of your state – it's quick, easy, and timely."

Open Source for America is a technology industry open source advocacy coalition.

GovLoop is a social network geared towards government employees with over 35,000+ members.

ProPublica is an honest nonprofit news organization that loves analyzing open government data.

Open Forum Foundation "are facilitators, working with government and technologists to ensure the future of government is in responsiveness."

Open Identity Exchange "The goal of OIX is to build trust in the exchange of identity credentials online."

Open Data Foundation "provides a place where the members of different communities can come together and work on the alignment of technology standards and software tools which will facilitate visibility and re-use of data at all levels of the statistical information chain. By promoting automated access to statistical data and metadata in this way, better decision-making becomes possible in many fields of research and policy-making."

Open Data Commons "is the home of a set of legal ‘tools’ to help you provide and use open data."


Insert non-formatted text here Development Seed DC - Drupal, creators of Open Atrium, a Drupal based project management system being run on GaryJohnson2012.com.

Phase Two Technology: DC - Drupal, creators of OpenPublic, a Drupal CMS distribution for federal government projects.

Bridge City Studio Portland - Drupal has a nice resources page.

CivicActions Berkeley - Drupal, CiviCRM constituent relationship management system of Drupal and Joomla.

Brattcollective.com is "a worker-owned and operated technology collective, focused on workplace democracy and promoting a democratic society while supporting like-minded businesses and organizations by providing open-source website development and consulting." They work with Aspiration Tech.

Radical Designs "is a full service web development group focused exclusively on the needs of non-profit and grassroots social change organizations."

Socrata "Complete, Turnkey Open Data Solutions for Government"

News and Commentary

The status of policy implementations of Open Government Data by Joshua Tauberer's Blog

GovFresh is a news organization that "inspires government-citizen collaboration and build a more engaged democracy."

OpenGovTV "provides Open Government and Gov 2.0 News, Information & Resources for businesses, government agencies, and constituents to more effectively participate in and benefit from the emerging technologies designed to restore this nation's economy and create jobs as a result of an Open Government."

All US Government IT Projects Under Review

Denmark urges government support for open source

Open Source for America The New Government Accountability

The Case for Government Promotion of Open Source Software

Digitalisér.dk Review

Joshua Tauberer's News Aggregator

Sandy Springs, Georgia: The City that Outsourced Everything

States

CivicApps Portland App Contest

Open Missouri

New York State Executive Order

Open Baltimore

Opportunities

Central Contractor Registration (CCR) is the primary registrant database for the U.S. Federal Government. CCR collects, validates, stores and disseminates data in support of agency acquisition missions. Is this the primary channel of US government communication with the private sector? If so, we need to start working with them to make APIs...

The projects that receive email funding.

Open CRS simply asks congress to make all the tax-payer funded reports of the $100m/year Congressional Research Service open and available to the tax-paying public. What is this money was allocated via open competitions?

8 Principles of Open Data

Unsorted

http://blogs.loc.gov/law/2011/01/thomas-off-of-thomas/

http://publicmarkup.org

http://www.votetocracy.com

http://www.localocracy.org

http://www.publicstuff.com

http://www.whitehouse2.org

http://localleaks.net (added)

http://nycwiki.org

http://crowdmap.com

http://everyblock.com

http://openblock.org

http://www.allourideas.org/planyc

http://wiki.civiccommons.org/New...

http://www.meetup.com/openny

http://www.meetup.com/speakupnyh...

http://roadify.com

Projects

MetaGovernment Project "The objective of the Metagovernment project is to enable individuals to be much more involved in their own governance, instead of relying on career politicians to take care of the important decisions in their life."

Federal Open Source Technology Score Card from Open Source for America.

IT Dashboard: The IT Dashboard is a website enabling federal agencies, industry, the general public and other stakeholders to view details of federal information technology investments -

FedSpace: FedSpace is a secure intranet and collaboration workspace for Federal employees and contractors.

Digitalizer: Danish Approach to FedSpace.

OpenCongress: Track bills, votes, people in Congress.

LittleSis: Free database of who-knows-who at the heights of business and government.

POPvox "bridges the gap between the input the public wants to provide and the information Members of Congress want and need to receive."

MetaVid: "The Open Video archive of the US Congress"

MapLight "Connect the Dots between Money and Votes"

Follow the Money "The Nation's Most Complete Resource for Information on Money in State Politics"

Open Secrets "OpenSecrets.org is your nonpartisan guide to money’s influence on U.S. elections and public policy. Whether you’re a voter, journalist, activist, student or interested citizen, use our free site to shine light on your government."

GovTrack Tracking Congress

Public=Online "“Government transparency is critical to creating a better democracy, and of highest importance in how I cast my vote. I pledge, through my sustained engagement, to hold public officials accountable for being open and transparent.”

CivicCommons "Sharing technolog for the public good."

GovHub open source repository for government.

Public.Resource.org makes bulk information from the government available like codes and court decisions.

The Open State Project collects and makes available data about state legislative activities, including bill summaries, votes, sponsorships, legislators, and committees.

"A ChangeCamp is a creative face-to-face gathering that is citizen-led, non-partisan and social web enabled

The First Earth Battalion Field Manual articulates a way for the US military to open itself up.

MuckRock is a website that helps you file, track, appeal, and eventually publish FOIA'd documents, all through a single web interface.

eDemocracy "We harness the power of online tools to support participation in public life, strengthen communities, and build democracy."

FutureGov is a consultancy and social innovation incubator helping to shape the future of government. We specialize in new media consultancy for government and social innovation. We also run campaigns and events.

Organizations

Sunlight Foundation has a tremendous amount of projects with which to collaboration.

Participatory Politics Foundation is a New York based nonprofit that built OpenCongress and is working on a similar application for open city and state governments.

Office of DC CTO is a primary mover in the open city government movement.

Code for America "Connecting city governments and Web 2.0 talent."

OpenPlans is a New York based nonprofit that helped create Open311 and other technology intensive open government projects.

Knowledge as Power: "KAP allows you to track legislation, communicate with lawmakers, and impact the laws of your state – it's quick, easy, and timely."

Open Source for America is a technology industry open source advocacy coalition.

GovLoop is a social network geared towards government employees with over 35,000+ members.

ProPublica is an honest nonprofit news organization that loves analyzing open government data.

Open Forum Foundation "are facilitators, working with government and technologists to ensure the future of government is in responsiveness."

Open Identity Exchange "The goal of OIX is to build trust in the exchange of identity credentials online."

Open Data Foundation "provides a place where the members of different communities can come together and work on the alignment of technology standards and software tools which will facilitate visibility and re-use of data at all levels of the statistical information chain. By promoting automated access to statistical data and metadata in this way, better decision-making becomes possible in many fields of research and policy-making."

Open Data Commons "is the home of a set of legal ‘tools’ to help you provide and use open data."

News and Commentary

The status of policy implementations of Open Government Data by Joshua Tauberer's Blog

GovFresh is a news organization that "inspires government-citizen collaboration and build a more engaged democracy."

OpenGovTV "provides Open Government and Gov 2.0 News, Information & Resources for businesses, government agencies, and constituents to more effectively participate in and benefit from the emerging technologies designed to restore this nation's economy and create jobs as a result of an Open Government."

All US Government IT Projects Under Review

Denmark urges government support for open source

Open Source for America The New Government Accountability

The Case for Government Promotion of Open Source Software

Digitalisér.dk Review

Joshua Tauberer's News Aggregator

Sandy Springs, Georgia: The City that Outsourced Everything

States

CivicApps Portland App Contest

Open Missouri

New York State Executive Order

Open Baltimore

Opportunities

Central Contractor Registration (CCR) is the primary registrant database for the U.S. Federal Government. CCR collects, validates, stores and disseminates data in support of agency acquisition missions. Is this the primary channel of US government communication with the private sector? If so, we need to start working with them to make APIs...

The projects that receive email funding.

Open CRS simply asks congress to make all the tax-payer funded reports of the $100m/year Congressional Research Service open and available to the tax-paying public. What is this money was allocated via open competitions?

8 Principles of Open Data

Unsorted

http://blogs.loc.gov/law/2011/01/thomas-off-of-thomas/

http://publicmarkup.org

http://www.votetocracy.com

http://www.localocracy.org

http://www.publicstuff.com

http://www.whitehouse2.org

http://localleaks.net (added)

http://nycwiki.org

http://crowdmap.com

http://everyblock.com

http://openblock.org

http://www.allourideas.org/planyc

http://wiki.civiccommons.org/New...

http://www.meetup.com/openny

http://www.meetup.com/speakupnyh...

http://roadify.com

Complementary Currency Resource Center

LETS: Local Exchange Trading Systems

Hub Culture

Slow Money

TimeBanks USA

BALLE

Transition Network

Meta Currency Projects

Threebles

Network Economy

Berkshares

Brooklyn Torch

Hour Exchange Portland

Transition USA

Davis Dollars

da Vinci Institute

Dyndy

One Blue Dot

35 social lending platforms

BitCoin

Directory of Barter Tools

B Notes Baltimore

Bernal Bucks San Fran Local Loyalty Program

http://trustcurrency.blogspot.com/

http://www.opensourcecurrency.org/

http://blog.newcurrencyfrontiers.com/

http://greensborocurrencyproject.blogspot.com/

http://ripple-project.org/

http://ccmag.net/

BALLE is a vehicle for connecting to local businesses.

Institute for Local Self-Reliance "mission is to provide innovative strategies, working models and timely information to support environmentally sound and equitable community development. To this end, ILSR works with citizens, activists, policymakers and entrepreneurs to design systems, policies and enterprises that meet local or regional needs; to maximize human, material, natural and financial resources; and to ensure that the benefits of these systems and resources accrue to all local citizens."

Yes We Can FLOAmerica

The American people feel trapped. They don't like the federal government but don't know how they'll receive their entitlements without it. The answer is better and more free/libre/open source (FLO) technologies.

FLO Technologies are often produced voluntarily, by self-motivated problem solvers who demand the freedom to create their own solutions to local challenges, just like Republicans!

If these problem solvers (sometimes called hackers) and Republicans teamed up, we could create FLO solutions that would help every American community operate their own social service organization without having to rely on the government.

  • We can develop complete solution sets for schools, hospitals, local governments, police and fire departments, and more using today's most popular FLO technologies. *We can do it for less than it costs to do a day of national advertising.
  • We can do it before the 2012 election.

Three ways to increase FLO:

  • Demand that government agencies only purchase FLO software with 'copyleft' licenses so all Americans have access to these solutions.
  • Refocus land-grant universities on the production and distribution of FLO technologies.
  • Fund the development of important FLO technologies through charitable contribution.

When the American people understand how they can solve their own problems, they will support candidates that want to reduce the size and scope of government. So, the next time someone asks "how can we do it ourselves," the answer is to "go with the FLO."

Blurb

Government software is the taxpayer's software.

Government data is the taxpayer's data.

All taxpayer financed software should be free/ libre/open source.

All taxpayer financed data should be accessible and standardized.

Go with the FLO, for Freedom, Liberty and Openness!

More FLO, Less Government

The American people feel trapped. They don't like the federal government but don't know how they'll receive their entitlements without it. The answer is better and more free/libre/open source (FLO) technologies. FLO technologies are different from proprietary (or closed) technologies because they allow anyone to use, modify, improve and share their building blocks with each other. This "freedom of use" enables individuals, organizations and communities to collaborate and customize their own technology solutions. When the American people understand how they can use FLO technologies to solve their own problems, they will support candidates that want to reduce the size and scope of government.

Four Important Trends

1. Free/Libre/Open source software makes it possible for every community to efficiently operate its own schools, hospitals and businesses without having to rely on government assistance.

2. Coworking, maker and personal fabrications spaces make it possible for every community to locally produce complex goods and services.

3. Community supported agriculture, complementary currencies and share networks preserve consumer choices while encouraging more the development of local wealth.

4. Open Government initiatives increase transparency, reduce fraud and enable us all to identify which programs we need to reassess, reduce and eliminate.

The New Economy

Our economy is in a state of transition from corporate production using industrial technologies to participatory production using networked technologies. This new type of production is performed by self-motivated problem solvers (sometimes called hackers) who demand the freedom to solve their own problems, just like Republicans!

If participatory producers and Republicans teamed up, we could create free/libre/open source solutions that enable every community to access the technologies they need to run efficient schools, hospitals, police and fire departments, municipal governments, social service organizations, libraries, community centers and more. Free people naturally produce FLO solutions, but the Republican party can turbocharge the amount of FLO accessible to every American community by demanding that government agencies purchase software with FLO licenses. Then, every American can benefit from the technologies developed with their taxpayer dollars.

Get to Know FLO

1. Ubuntu Linux is a world class operating system that provides its users with access to tons of great FLO software.

2. Firefox is the world's most popular web browser and its parent organization Mozilla produces other great FLO products.

3. Open Office performs all the functions of Microsoft Office and more, for free.

4. CiviCRM enables any organization to manage their constituents with enterprise grade tools.

5. Drupal and Joomla make building highly functional enterprise websites cheap and easy!

Fear vs. Freedom

Topic Fear Freedom
War "We fight them over there so we don't have to fight them over here." -George W. Bush "Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none." -Thomas Jefferson
Drugs We'll lock em all up even if we need to build more prisons ---George HW Bush? "Reduce the harm of addiction."
Government Leo Strauss quote supporting government secrecy. "Sunlight is the best disinfectant." -Sunlight Foundation
1st Amendment "If it’s found that Assange hasn’t violated the law, then the law should be changed." -Mitch McConnell "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." -1st Amendment of The US Constitution
Currency "Recessions … can be fought simply by printing money — and can sometimes (usually) be cured with surprising ease." -Paul Krugman "The cause of waves of unemployment is not 'capitalism' but governments denying enterprise the right to produce good money." -F.A. Hayek
Environment Global conspiracy Seven generations quote
Operations Proprietary Free/Libre/Open Source
Union In support of partisan bickering "A House divided cannot stand."


Corporate Sabotage of the GOP

  • The corporation is an authoritarian organizational structure that conflicts with the values of personal liberty and democracy.
  • Corporations actively suppress the expression of liberty-based values in the workplace, public and private spheres.
  • Republicans who receives large sums of money from corporate sources - the media, publishers, consulting firms, military contractors, etc - should be mindful of the influence these organizations have on personal commitment to liberty and democracy.
  • By resisting the consistent application of principles based on the fundamentally American concepts of liberty and democracy, some Republicans are actively, if unknowingly, sabotaging their party and the nation.

The Benefits of Local Beer

  • Freshness
  • Variety
  • Local wealth
  • Community business
  • Less oil
  • Local resource awareness

What Path are Your On

If Liberty isn't guiding you, what path are you on?


FLOAmerica

  • Home

A very quiet technology revolution is taking place in America, one that the corporate media refuses to discuss. It's called 'free software' by some, 'libre software' by others and more recently 'open source.' We call it FLO - free/libre/open - for short. Unlike proprietary software, which is produced by individuals or corporations who then sell the right to use their software to their customers, FLO is often built by volunteers who're simply interesting in overcoming a technological challenge. In the beginning, these challenges were often highly complicated server side software solutions that only technologists faced, but over time, FLO solution emerged for more 'consumer' oriented tasks like word processing and online publishing. In the last few years, FLO solutions have begun to proliferate so rapidly that there is now a FLO alternative for almost every type of software program, from entire operating systems to accounting programs, 3D graphics to spreadsheets, social networks to customer relationship management systems. In fact, FLO has become so advanced and varied that FLO technologies can now integrate together to create massive technology solutions that were accessible only to the most well funded corporation just a few years ago. Indeed, it's possible today for an organization to build and maintain a public website and private intranet that would have cost $500,000 two to three years ago for less than $5,000 today, and that price continues to fall. Possibly more significant than the drastically reduced costs of deploying these systems is how little training people need to maintain and customize these systems for their own needs. Anyone who understands the breadth of FLO technologies available today recognizes that FLO will transform our society by empowering local communities to overcome their own challenges.

FLO solutions are, first and foremost, free from restrictive licensing so anyone and everyone can use, modify, improve and share the technologies they develop without having to worry about who 'owns' what, why and for how long. This allows people to create more products because they can specialize in what they do best, and let others do the rest.

Many of the most popular web-based FLO technologies consist of a platform-components architecture in which a team of highly skilled technologists develop an advanced 'platform' (of 'core') that less skilled technologists add functionality to by building small, containable components. Users with almost no technical skills can then 'install' and arrange these component to create their own custom solutions. This architecture let's everyone participate in the development and deployment of FLO, whether they're hardcore coders or softcore users.

Imagine for a moment if a school decided to use FLO technologies to construct its technology solution. The process would be quite simple. The school would outline its needs, evaluate the available FLO technologies, pick a platform that has the most useful architecture and components, install all the FLO components they need and develop the components that don't already exist. Once the project is done, the school wouldn't just have a complete technology solution for itself, but a set of components that any school using the same FLO technology platform could use for themselves. How many other schools would need to do the same before every school in the world had access to all the technologies they needed to create their own state-of-the-art technology solution? The answer is very, very few. What's true for schools is also true for hospitals, local governments, police departments, water treatment facilities, utilities, farms and businesses of all types.

Here's a proposition: let's develop FLO components for the three most popular FLO platforms that provide every American with the functionality he or she needs to organize and operate their own schools, hospitals, local governments, police and fire departments, civic and culture organizations and more. Let's do it for less than a major political party spends in a day of national TV advertisements, and let's do it before the 2012 elections. Then, when people ask us how the American can provide themselves with services more effectively than the federal government, we can simply respond: "by going with the FLO."

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Random Ideas

How can we use open-sourced technology to mitigate purchases for common, simple products?


Not all of these ideas necessarily relate to the major questions poised, but rather they tend to lead into and inspire each other.


Drupal

1) Healthcare - upload patient records onto CMS's that's used by hospital networks

2) Schools - managing grades, times, events, files, etc.

  • Revising University CMS, such as Blackboard which costs thousands of dollars a year

3) Veterans networking website

4) Homeless shelters negotiating needs

5) Nonprofit food/shelter organizations communicating about needs

6) Organizing taxes and tax return forms for governments

7) Managing parks around the country

8) Cities, government websites

  • Tourism - Build a central platform for tourism websites, perhaps using the [NFT model]

9) Public Transit Info

  • Organizing schedules, train arrivals, logistics
  • Put wireless networks in buses, tunnels, trains, tracks in order to communicate instantly

10) News media

11) Employee logistics

  • Clocking in hours
  • Using a touchscreen to clock-in
  • Clock-in's can immediately be mapped onto a spreadsheet
    • Employers no longer have to deal with data entry, but data manipulation


This reminded me of a phrase, "Less tech, more human"


Twitter for Companies

Instead of tedious one-sentence emails, have sound-bites delivered instantly

  • Removes dependence on IM programs or conference calls
    • Perhaps there are open source programs for IM and Conference Calling


I decided to sharpen my focus a little:


Why do organizations need to pay developers/professionals to personalize their product and train their employees?

There is no reason to train your employees in things that don't directly relates to your organization.

  • Less tech, more human

1) Open-source projects of open-source projects

  • Make a project to simplify Drupal
  • Make a project to specify Drupal
    • Drupal for education
    • Drupal for healthcare

2) Hire firms to streamline them

3) Make simple instruction manuals

4) How-to pages

5) Videos

6) Ready-made versions

7) Simple-English

8) Simple Content Management : Simple English meets How-to

People record and file data abstractly - NO ONE knows how to properly organize. Although it is natural for us to record information in our brains, we never consciously organize it because our brains do it for us.

  • Why should people organize? Let them do their jobs

We can write software that allows people to abstractly record information, but it automatically organizes it.

  • No more hiring temporary professionals
  • No more training periods

Unorganized [Resources: FLO America].

[FLOAmerican.org Site Development]