Help:Using Citations

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Adding Information from 3rd Party Sources

Fair Dealing and Fair Use

If you plan on adding 3rd party quotes to this wiki please review the Fair Use and Fair Dealing policies.

Formatting Quotes on the Wiki

When adding a citation please use the following formatting when adding content from 3rd party sources~

  1. Start and end your quote with quotation marks - shows that you are quoting
  2. Use italics for the content of your submission - this helps end users identify the quotes
  3. Immediately following the quote place a url or other citation information in parentheses - helps users track down sources

Example entry, as you would enter it:

''"The [[Cooperative Ecology Project]] provides a complete set of tools for joining together 
enterprises in a geographic area to form a sustainable self-sufficient [[Commons Based]] 
support system."''~Alex Rollin (http://alexrollin.com/content/cooperative-ecology-project)

Example text as it shows after saving it: "The Cooperative Ecology Project provides a complete set of tools for joining together enterprises in a geographic area to form a sustainable self-sufficient Commons Based support system."~Alex Rollin (http://alexrollin.com/content/cooperative-ecology-project)

Use the Cite Extension

The basic concept of the <ref> tag is that it inserts the text enclosed by the ref tags as a footnote in a designated section, which you indicate with the placeholder tag <references/>. The new format cannot be used interchangeably with the old format — you must pick one or the other.

If you forget to include <references/> in the article, the footnotes will not appear, but a red error message will be displayed at the end of the page.

This page itself uses footnotes, such as the one at the end of this sentence.[1] If you view the source of this page by clicking "Edit this page", you can see a working example of footnotes.

Example

According to scientists, the Sun is pretty big.<ref>E. Miller, The Sun, (New York: Academic Press, 2005), 23-5.</ref>
The Moon, however, is not so big.<ref>R. Smith, "Size of the Moon", Scientific American, 46 (April 1978): 44-6.</ref>

==Notes==
<references/>

Multiple uses of the same footnote

To give a footnote a unique identifier, use <ref name="name">. You can then refer to the same footnote again by using a ref tag with the same name. The text inside the second tag doesn't matter, because the text already exists in the first reference. You can either copy the whole footnote, or you can use a terminated empty ref tag that looks like this: <ref name="name" />.

In the following example, the same source is cited three times.

This is an example of multiple references to the same footnote.<ref name="multiple">Remember that when you refer to the same footnote multiple times, the text from the first reference is used.</ref>

Such references are particularly useful when citing sources, if different statements come from the same source.<ref name="multiple">This text is superfluous, and won't show up anywhere. We may as well just use an empty tag.</ref>

A concise way to make multiple references is to use empty ref tags, which have a slash at the end. Although this may reduce redundant work, please be aware that if a future editor removes the first reference, this will result in the loss of all references using the empty ref tags.<ref name="multiple" />

==Notes==
<references/>

The text above gives the following result in the article (see also section below):

This is an example of multiple references to the same footnote.[2]

Such references are particularly useful when citing sources, when different statements come from the same source.[2]

A concise way to make multiple references is to use empty ref tags, which have a slash at the end. Although this may reduce redundant work, please be aware that if a future editor removes the first reference, this will result in the loss of all references using the empty ref tags.[2]

Note: name= identifiers require alphabetic characters; solely relying on numerals will generate an error message

<references/>

Placing <references/> inserts the full text of all pending inline citations defined by <ref>, anywhere on the page. For example, based on the citations above, the code:

<references/>

will yield:

  1. This footnote is used as an example in the "How to use" section.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Remember that when you refer to the same footnote multiple times, the text from the first reference is used.

In some language editions of Wikipedia, long reference lists may be placed using the template {{Reflist}}, which incorporates <references/>. It provides an optional parameter to display the reference list in multiple columns. For instance, the English, Hindi and Interlingua Wikipedias use the css selector references-small to make the reference text smaller than normal text.

In the case of multiple references-tags on a page, each gives the references defined in the ref-tags from the previous references-tag. In the case that these references-tags are produced by templates, each gives the references defined in the ref-tags before the first references-tag, and there is an error message that there is a ref-tag but not a references-tag.

Markup Your Submission

  • Do add wiki links to relevant words or phrases in the quote
  • Do add your citation information to the bottom of the article as well

You can see in the example above that Cooperative Ecology Project is linked. Try a search to see if you can find other ways to link your submission.

Use the More Information Section

The more information section should be added to the bottom of every page.

It looks like this, if you need to add it yourself:

=More Information=
==Internal Links==
*[[Cooperative Ecology Project]]
==External Links==
*[http://alexrollin.com/content/cooperative-ecology-project Cooperative Ecology Project on AlexRollin.com]

Once you have added it, it looks like this for the visitor,and shows up in the index at the head of the page.

More Information

Internal Links

External Links