Sources for an Alternative Political Economy

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Typology

by Neil Fligstein and Steven Vogel:

"* We know about these possibilities from the work of economic sociologists, who stress the political, cultural, and social embedding of real-world markets.

Example: The Handbook of Economic Sociology: Second Edition 2nd Edition by Neil J. Smelser (Editor), Richard Swedberg (Editor). Princeton University Press, 2005


  • From work in comparative political economy, demonstrating how the relationships between government and industry and among firms, banks, and unions vary from one country to another.

Ex: Comparative Political Economy: States, Markets and Global Capitalism 2014th Edition by Ben Clift. Red Globe Press, 2014.


  • From political and economic geographers, who place regional economies in their spatial contexts and natural environments.

Ex: The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Economic Geography (Wiley Blackwell Companions to Geography) 1st Edition. by Trevor J. Barnes (Editor), Jamie Peck et al. Wiley-Blackwell, 2016


  • From economic historians, who explore the transformation of the institutions of capitalism over time.

EX: Favorites of Fortune: Technology, Growth, and Economic Development since the Industrial Revolution. by Patrice Higonnet (Editor), David S. Landes et al. Harvard University Press, 1991


  • From an emergent Law and Political Economy (LPE) movement that aspires to shift priorities from efficiency to power, from neutrality to equality, and from apolitical governance to democracy.

Ex: LAW AND POLITICAL ECONOMY: TOWARD A MANIFESTO JEDEDIAH BRITTON-PURDY, AMY KAPCZYNSKI, DAVID SINGH GREWAL. URL = https://lpeproject.org/blog/law-and-political-economy-toward-a-manifesto/


  • And from economists — often villainized as the agents of neoliberalism — who are exploring novel approaches to the problem of inequality and the slowdown in productivity, and show renewed concern with the economic dominance of a few large firms."

Ex: Unbound: How Inequality Constricts Our Economy and What We Can Do about It Hardcover – October 25, 2019 by Heather Boushey. Harvard University Press, 2019.

(https://economicsociology.org/2020/10/08/political-economy-after-neoliberalism-a-manifesto-for-new-thinking/amp/?)