Pathways to Collective Leadership in Public Sector Entities

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  • Together We Can: Pathways to Collective Leadership in Agriculture at Texas A&M. By Edward A. Hiler and Steven L. Bosserman. Texas A&M University Press, 2011.

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Description

"Together We Can recounts effective strategies for institutional change and focuses on collective leadership within the land-grant university system, with reflections on Hiler's long and successful career in academic leadership, both at Texas A&M University and within the larger Texas A&M System.

Although many books discuss leadership and organizational change in the private sector, there are relatively few dealing with public-sector entities—especially public land-grant universities and academic agencies—and none on collective leadership, the standard for highly collaborative and interdependent groups and individuals." (http://books.google.co.th/books/about/Together_We_Can.html?id=ucYWy9rIhaIC&redir_esc=y)


Steve Bosserman writes:

"The book focuses on Dr. Hiler's and my experiences at Texas A&M during the 1993 - 2003 period. However, much of the leadership for institutional change material in the book stems from a series of thirteen projects covered by the Food Systems Professions Education initiative funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation during the mid-to-late 1990s. I was fortunate to be a change consultant to seven of them and it was through those collective experiences that I developed a theory in practice which Dr. Hiler and I implemented at Texas A&M. In that respect, the context was much broader than just one state and one university system but actually included over twenty universities and colleges in seven states. In addition, the entry point for the change process was the college of agriculture in the land-grant institution for each state. That tapped into the tripartite mission of land-grants - teaching, research, and extension / outreach - which impacted communities throughout each state." (email, February 2012)