Metaverse

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In the narrow sense, Virtual Worlds that are primarily social rather than game oriented

Example: Second Life


Typology

In the broad sense:

- Virtual worlds, for gaming (World of Warcraft) or not (Second Life)

- Mirror Worlds or [[Paraverse]s (such as Google Earth or Google Map)

- Augmented Reality (add to physical world, enriches real objects)

- Lifelogging,our life events augmented with information


Discussion

Predictions for the future impact of the Metaverse, by Mark Wallace at http://www.3pointd.com/20070401/3pointd-turns-1-on-the-metaverse-ahead/ :

Summary:

"• Much of broadcast media will evolve to incorporate virtual worlds and geospatial technologies

• The display of information will take on three dimensions where useful, and we’ll find ways to make 3D models and worlds useful in more and more areas

• The physical world will stream digital information directly to mobile devices

• Lifelogging, geospatial technologies and the heightened expressive power of virtual worlds will make possible deeper communication between people" (http://www.3pointd.com/20070401/3pointd-turns-1-on-the-metaverse-ahead/)


Details:

"Much of broadcast media will evolve to incorporate virtual worlds and geospatial technologies We’re already seeing this, of course, in virtual worlds like MTV’s Virtual Laguna Beach. Just as it’s nearly impossible to have a viable media property today without a parallel Web property, there will eventually be a large class of media properties for which it will be de rigeur to have a VW property attached. This extends to marketing as well as entertainment media, and to geospatial and augmented reality technologies as well as virtual worlds. As more and more people gain easy access to these technologies, more and more brands and media companies will use them to engage audiences. A flat Web page will no longer be enough in a world in which you can offer your audience the chance to participate in their favorite show, or to view and interact with a 3D model of the product they’re considering purchasing.

The display of information will take on three dimensions where useful, and we’ll find ways to make 3D models and worlds useful in more and more areas Edward Tufte produced one of the most compelling illustrations of how powerful the visual display of quantitive information can be. Adding a third dimension to the display of many datasets will be more powerful still (as well as a fourth: time, in the form of animations). Phear the 3D PowerPoint presentation! (3PowerPointD?) But it won’t stop there. We’ll also see interactable virtual 3D models of physical objects, of people, of buildings, of cities, etc., models we’ll be able to inhabit it avatar form. And from within this virtual cosmos — from the virtual objects, the virtual worlds, the mirror worlds, and from the worlds that are all at once — we’ll be able to extract a range of valuable information I can’t even begin to describe here, about how those things and places work, about how we interact with them, about how we interact with each other, etc., etc.

The physical world will stream digital information directly to mobile devices Augmented reality. You’ll have access while you’re on the move to a whole range of information that’s only beginning to become apparent. We can already Google for maps, menus, bus schedules, shoe sales and movie times from our mobile phones, but this is a little different. This is a movie trailer that’s beamed to you directly from the movie theater you’re standing in front of. This is the restaurant that tells you whether any of your friends are inside when you walk by. This is the on-ramp itself telling you how congested the freeway is in time for you to decide on an alternate route. This is the gas pump that automatically charges you for filling up your car (with enviro-friendly fuel, natch). This is the kind of ubiquitous computing that knows how much light you need when you’re working on a document on your laptop versus playing a video game on your console. This is an area I’m not feeling very inspired about predictioning in at the moment, but let your imagination run wild.

Lifelogging, geospatial technologies and the heightened expressive power of virtual worlds will make possible deeper communication between people You didn’t realize MySpace was a Kurzweilian technology, did you? MySpace is generally referred to as a social networking site, but I think of it as more of an identity-creation site; it’s a place where people have begun uploading their personalities to computers. This is the lifelogging piece: We’re now able to quantify and store more and more information about ourselves, and the under-18 generation is more and more interested in doing so. We may not always be interested in publishing this information broadly, but we’ll definitely start to take advantage of new ways to store it locally and to use it to extract new information about ourselves, and to tailor our interactions with the rest of the world. We’ll take advantage of geospatial and mobile technologies (as well as the augmented reality mentioned above) to better connect, much as Dodgeball and some uses of Twitter are beginning to let us. And “presence” — the ability to simulate being in the same place, whether in a 3D world or on a 2D page via an app like me.dium (which lets you “follow” friends from Web page to Web page and chat with them) — will enhance the ways we communicate online, giving us new modes of expression that aren’t generally available to us unless we’re in the same physical place." (http://www.3pointd.com/20070401/3pointd-turns-1-on-the-metaverse-ahead/)


More Information

Intro article by Susan Kish

See our entries:

  1. Open Source Metaverse and Open Source Virtual Worlds
  2. Metaverse Roadmap
  3. Metaverse Economies