Difference between revisions of "Hypercar"

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(Added link to http://green.autoblog.com/2007/01/27/interview-with-michael-brylawski-of-rmi-part-four-hypercar-con/)
 
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=Description=
 
=Description=
Energy analyst Amory Lovins at the Rocky Mountain Institute has developed the design concept of the Hypercar. This vehicle would have ultra-light construction with an aerodynamic  body using advanced composite materials, low-drag design, and hybrid drive.[1]  Designers of the Hypercar claim that it would achieve a three- to five-fold improvement in fuel economy, equal or better performance, safety, amenity, and affordability, compared with today's cars.<ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypercar</ref>
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Energy analyst Amory Lovins at the [[Rocky Mountain Institute]] has developed the design concept of the Hypercar. This vehicle would have ultra-light construction with an aerodynamic  body using advanced composite materials, low-drag design, and hybrid drive.[1]  Designers of the Hypercar claim that it would achieve a three- to five-fold improvement in fuel economy, equal or better performance, safety, amenity, and affordability, compared with today's cars.<ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypercar</ref>
  
 
=References=
 
=References=

Latest revision as of 14:05, 17 February 2010

URL: http://move.rmi.org/markets-in-motion/case-studies/automotive/hypercar.html

Description

Energy analyst Amory Lovins at the Rocky Mountain Institute has developed the design concept of the Hypercar. This vehicle would have ultra-light construction with an aerodynamic body using advanced composite materials, low-drag design, and hybrid drive.[1] Designers of the Hypercar claim that it would achieve a three- to five-fold improvement in fuel economy, equal or better performance, safety, amenity, and affordability, compared with today's cars.[1]

References

See Also